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OSB floor concern
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June 27, 2016
12:43 am
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Eric95070
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June 26, 2016
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Hi everyone. I recently read that the floor is osb, and susceptible to rot. Does anyone know if Riverside is planning to use water resistant material, or if there is someway to protect the unit from water? I understand the frame is aluminum, which is great, but the floor is almost as important (after the roof).

June 27, 2016
7:25 am
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Kristopher
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Eric95070 said
Hi everyone. I recently read that the floor is osb, and susceptible to rot. Does anyone know if Riverside is planning to use water resistant material, or if there is someway to protect the unit from water? I understand the frame is aluminum, which is great, but the floor is almost as important (after the roof).  

Eric,

These are pretty valid concerns. All OSB is water proofed to a point due to the resins they use to glue the wood particles together. OSB is a much better choice then using plywood. They do make more water resistant OSB but to figure out if Riverside used that during the build process would mean tearing up your flooring to find the water proof stamp. It doesn’t matter what water proof rating your OSB flooring has if you have water thats sitting on the wood eventually its going to get into it. My last travel trailer had a OSB flooring as well I never had any flooring problems, it was built in 2005. Using OSB flooring in a travel trailer is pretty common and its going to be hard to find a Travel Trailer without OSB flooring. The trick with OSB flooring is to make sure the water can’t sit on the wood for long periods of time. Yes they do make resins you can apply to the flooring to make it more water resistant. My White Water Retro has a tarp like covering over the bottom side of the OSB floor which I took a picture of below. I hope that helps and maybe some other people can chime in with there experiences.

White Water Retro OSB FlooringImage Enlarger

September 3, 2016
10:16 am
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Captn Sharpie
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To add to this discussion from what I have read the owner of any Rv must nonetheless be ever vigilant.  I agree with Kristopher that OSB has many advantages over most other materials, except maybe marine ply.  There is however a weak spot in the edges.  These should be sealed by the RV manufacturer.  The road side does seem to be well protected by the black sheathing.  But the floor side can be susceptible to water intrusion from plumbing leaks and faulty drainage of air conditioning units.  I have read anecdotal reports of two Retro owners who had major problems with rotting floors.  The sequence in which RVs are built starts with the OSB floor over the trailer frame.  EVERYTHING else is installed on top of this: aluminum or wood frame, linoleum, walls , furniture, appliances, etc.  My unit seems to have a slight soft spot on the starboard side aft of the AC.  I am posting a separate question on this

November 12, 2017
3:35 am
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Perrypridgen
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To add further and speak from experience… I just purchased a brand new ( never been used ) 177se from a friend and dealer with full knowledge that the floor was soft. Soft wasn’t really a good discription as after removing the linoleum you could grab handsfull of soggy, black mold infested wood chips… it was like mulch moreso than flooring.

 I have now re-floored in sections from the door the the bathroom and all the way to the rear. I used 5/8 plywood and gave each piece a double dose of Thompson’s water seal on all sides to include the cut ends. I will be filling the joints and putting on new linoleum today and then putting down hardwood laminate flooring.

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November 12, 2017
3:55 pm
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Captn Sharpie
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I emphasize with you.  My 2014 Retro 177 came with a soft spot below the wall-mounted a/c.  Also gallon jug of water under the passenger side seat spilled and led to the mush similar to your photos.  And I have softness in the doorway.  I plan to cut out and replace with ply as you did.  Was the original OSB 5/8″ ?  How did you go about cutting out the bad material without damaging the black fabric liner?  Did you have any  trouble fitting the outside edge of your plywood between the fame and base of the wall?

I was thinking of routing a half-lap or ship-lap into the edge to the old OSB and then on the corresponding edges of the plywood patch for a stronger joint and seal.

Did you have softness under the a/c and, if so, have you remedied that design flaw?  New 177s have a ceiling mounted unit.

November 12, 2017
6:33 pm
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Perrypridgen
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Captn Sharpie said
I emphasize with you.  My 2014 Retro 177 came with a soft spot below the wall-mounted a/c.  Also gallon jug of water under the passenger side seat spilled and led to the mush similar to your photos.  And I have softness in the doorway.  I plan to cut out and replace with ply as you did.  Was the original OSB 5/8″ ?  How did you go about cutting out the bad material without damaging the black fabric liner?  Did you have any  trouble fitting the outside edge of your plywood between the fame and base of the wall?

I was thinking of routing a half-lap or ship-lap into the edge to the old OSB and then on the corresponding edges of the plywood patch for a stronger joint and seal.

Did you have softness under the a/c and, if so, have you remedied that design flaw?  New 177s have a ceiling mounted unit.  

The last pic is the passenger side rear. Former owner says dehumidifier he had rigged up to dump into the shower popped out all summer while he was staying in Maine, and drained in the floor. Either way not sure where water came from.  Flooring IS 5/8 inch or for the super litigious that ruined typical measurement that’s been used for 70 years 0.566 “ ( lol )! 

 I did mine in section due to the fact that the walls are through bolted to the frame through the floors. I cut through the current decking just shy of going through, with a typical circular saw. 90% of it comes off right at the cut when you pull up on it. The rest I cut gently with a Stanley knife.

 The area under the bathroom and fridge were ok so I cut back to good wood and just joined up to it. I only had issues aft of the passenger side fender well ( under the A\C ) as the wall had settled slightly. I used my floor jack on the bolt from below and a medium pry par on the decking to get is started and then a 3lb persuasion devise to drive it outward to the siding. You will need to notch it where the wall bolts drop through to the frame attachments.  Will reattach the fenders ( which seems to be little more than A\C duct work )With screws rather than staples and reseal everything with silicone. Foam spray for larger gaps in anything and then follow with 100% silicone.

 We will be whiting out all the wood and the walls and doing checkerboard floors with retro turquoise sparkle vinyl seats with white vinyl inserts and beading. Momma has selected new antique turquoise glass faceted knobs and pulls and has some awesome retro curtain material picked out.looking to do turquoise and black boomerang pattern on white background for the dinette, kitchen and building an attachable picnic table to go under the awning. I will keep you up to date on any & all mods. This should be fun.

 I will also be building a set of less expensive and more stable lift blocks and when I get them done will post pics for anyone interested. I will make it to where anyone can duplicate it cheaply or build them if people want them. Our family used to own a trailer manufacturing company. This torsion axle is easy to raise to keep from dragging all your stuff underneath! 

November 17, 2017
3:30 pm
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Captn Sharpie
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Having a few days of good weather.  I am finding that I have damaged OSB all along the passenger or “starboard” side from the bottom of the curved rear wall to the bottom of the curved front wall 18 – 24″ in from the wall.  So I am needing to remove all the built in furniture on that side.  This involves the settee seat, the aluminum threshold, the kitchen unit, the bed frame, and the tall clothes closet.  I have removed all of the square-headed screws.  Nothing seems to want to budge, especially from the kitchen unit.

I suspect that construction adhesive is involved.  So I am going slow in order to minimize damage to the wall and to the furniture. Any suggestions on how to remove these pieces?  I can slide a thin putty knife behind most of the few pieces except for a few stubborn areas.  Also I noticed that several lines (pipes and tubes) pass thru holes cut into the shelf under the sink section.  How did you accomplish tackling this?

I have a similar question when it comes to fitting the new floor patches around the two water lines, two gas lines, and the waste pipe.

November 17, 2017
5:52 pm
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Perrypridgen
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Ok! The holes you need can be redrilled with a holesaw. I used the holes in the tyvek, to give me a center drillbit location, from the bottom, then holesaw from the top. 

 All the lines can be unscrewed to facilitate replacing the decking. Be sure to take pics of wiring connections to the heater. If not, I did! 

The kitchen cabinets are attached with the square drive screws AND a screw and a few staples from the outside in… just use a pry bar and they’ll come right out. Then you can snip em off with dikes. 

The devking can be replaced by making the joints AT the beams!

December 10, 2017
4:37 pm
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Perrypridgen
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Some of the floors in

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